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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 23, 2016 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. prison guards are back in control as a disturbance at swaleside in kent is brought to an end. 60 inmates were involved. it's the fourth major incident at an english prison in less than two months. good morning, it's friday the 23rd december. also this morning: a country on high alert. two men are arrested on terror charges in germany as the hunt continues for the man responsible for the attack on a christmas market. delays and disruption are expected as millions of people hit the roads, rails and skies before christmas. good morning from coventry. they are calling it frenzied friday. 10
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million of us are expected to hit the supermarkets today for a last—minute christmas shop. so what do you need to know and the top tips for survival? i'll have the details. crystal palace are looking for a new manager after sacking alan pardew after just one win in 11 matches. he leaves the club sitting just above the relegation zone. and carol has the christmas forecast in a lovely, festive location. good morning from covent garden, where we have got the tallest live christmas tree in london. the weather isn't very festive, though, storm barbara up on our shores bringing gusts up to 90 mph in the far north of scotland and the northern isles. the rest of scotland, northern ireland and northern england, between 60 and 90 mph, not as bad as that further south but still looking at a windy day, plus some rain. more on all of that in 15 minutes. we will see you then. thank you. good morning, first our main story.
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the prison service says specialist guards have resolved a disturbance at swaleside jail in kent, the fourth major incident at an english prison in less than two months. around 60 inmates took control of part of one wing yesterday evening, but were returned to their cells overnight. 0ur reporter peter whittlesea is outside swaleside prison for us this morning. two men have been arrested in germany on suspicion of planning an attack on a shopping centre near the dutch border. the brothers were detained early this morning. germany is on high alert after monday's attack in berlin, which left 12 people dead. authorities have issued an arrest—warrant for tunisian man anis amri, whose fingerprints were found in the truck which ploughed into crowds. catriona renton has more. caught on a taxi's dashboard—mounted camera, the moment the lorry ploughed into the christmas market. the footage has been slowed down. 12 people were killed, and dozens more were injured. you can see people flee. this is anis amri, filming himself, humming a tune in berlin, a video posted to his
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facebook page in september. the 24—year—old is now europe's most wanted man. first, his id documents were found in the cab of the lorry, then his fingerprints were discovered on the driver's door and inside the lorry. raids at the addresses of anis amri's known contacts in germany turned up nothing. his family in tunisia last saw him five years ago. they say he wasn't religious, drank alcohol, and dreamed of owning a car and starting a business. his mother spoke to reporters. translation: i have four sons, including him, and i think we will not be counting him anymore. the news is very bad. we want to know the truth, if it is really him who did this, and then we will all punish him. germany's security services remain on high alert. last night police arrested two brothers, originally from kosovo, suspected of planning an attack on a shopping mall in the western
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city of 0berhausen. it is not clear if the alleged plot was in any way connected with monday's attack in berlin. now the breitscheidplatz market is back up and running. it isa it is a show from berlin is of defiance, strength and not giving in as the investigation into what happened here continues. catriona renton, bbc news. preparing for your christmas getaway? expect a delay or two. this weekend sees major engineering works begin on lines in and out of london, manchester and cardiff. drivers are also likely to face tailbacks, as people head home for christmas. in contrast, airports across britain are experiencing the busiest festive travel getaway ever, with more of us planning to leave the country than ever before over christmas and new year. 0ur transport correspondent richard westcott has the details. it's one of the busiest lines in
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britain. a vital link between london, south—west england and south wales. but they're shutting this section near london tomorrow as part of the biggest rail upgrade programme ever taken on. 211,000 staff will work on 200 projects across britain, but why pick christmas? we have a huge programme of works that we have to deliver as pa rt of works that we have to deliver as part of our railway upgrade programme and some of that work can't be done on a live railway, we have to shut the railway. so christmas is the best time to do it because it's one of the quietest times of the year. it will hit services across the country. london's paddington station will close for six days after the last train leaves. services at other big stations, including london bridge, charing cross and liverpool street will be severely affected. there will be severely affected. there will be severely affected. there will be no trains late on christmas eve between cardiff central, bridgend, newport and the valleys as they finished the biggest re— signal in god ever done. services around
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central manchester will also be affected. christmas engineering work overran affected. christmas engineering work overra n two yea rs affected. christmas engineering work overran two years ago causing chaos because the backup plan failed. network rail says it's much better prepared now and all holiday work since then has gone without a hitch. a lack of trains will make it harder to get to some of the airports too. christmas eve is one of their busiest days of the year and it will make the roads more congested. although 511,000 miles of road works are either being finished off or removed altogether during the holidays to try to ease anyjams. richard westcott, bbc news. we can speak now to our reporter anisa kadri, who is at london paddington station for us. it looks pretty quiet and subdued at the moment, but i imagine panic will be setting in a little later? yes. good morning. we have seen a few travellers here with big suitcases
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heading for heathrow airport as well as to south—west england, the west country and south wales, heading home for christmas of course. but it should pick up a bit more later on. but if anyone turns up tomorrow to catch a train from this station, well, they won't be getting on it because the station will be closed for engineering works for a few days. indeed network rail says it's carrying out works across 200 projects in total and they include ongoing work in manchester, as well as upgrading the tracks in cardiff. what their advice is planned in advance as much as possible, and they said check online. —— plan. that's where you're going to get your most up to date information and if you are keen on social media then searched the hash tag christmas works on twitter. thanks very much.
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we will we'll speak to the chief executive of network rail, mark carne just after 7am. the syrian army has declared victory in aleppo. the east of the city had been held by rebels for more than four years, becoming a symbol of the opposition to president assad. state media said the last convoy taking rebel fighters and civilians had left. in a statement on syrian tv, an army commander said they would now liberate the rest of the country. the government is injecting £60 million a year to help first—time buyers get a foot on the housing ladder in areas where locals are crowded out of the market by second home owners. housing minister gavin barwell said the cash would be channelled through local councils to community—led groups providing affordable housing. the south—west will receive the most funding. people sleeping rough are 17 times more likely to be a victim of crime than members of the public. that's according to homeless charity crisis. they also found 80% of homeless people are regularly
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attacked and abused, some even urinated on. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan has more. london commuter trains provided a place of safety and shelter for one man who was homeless for five years. he would sleep on the carriages heading in and out of the city. he became frightened of the streets after becoming the subject of an unprovoked attack one night. after becoming the subject of an unprovoked attack one nightlj after becoming the subject of an unprovoked attack one night. i was in leicester square, got into a discussion with a young man around the fact i was homeless. he became quite aggravated i would guess by the fact i was homeless and i was saying being homeless isn't a choice and your homeless for different reasons and then he punched me in the face, and it was quite nasty. his experience is fairly common, says today's survey could. 30% of rough sleepers say they've been deliberately hit or kicked. 31% say they've had things thrown at them.
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7% were actually urinated on. most we re 7% were actually urinated on. most were attacked by people they didn't know. it's notjust the incident itself but it's the impact it has on that individual, on their mental health, on their ability to even ask for help. we found that most homeless people who are sleeping feel ashamed already and surely if you're then urinated on your going to feel more ashamed and even more marginalised. crisis say homeless people rarely report crimes as they don't think the police will take them seriously. they want officers to send a strong message to rough sleepers that their safety is paramount and that any abuses they suffer will be fully investigated. michael buchanan, bbc news. for the first time ever a snow leopard has been recorded with four cubs. the footage has been captured on a camera trap in mongolia as part of monitoring work which began in 2011. it's the first time that quadruplet cubs have been registered. according to the world wildlife fund there are between 4,000 and 6,500 snow leopards living in the wild.
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the cats are threatened by poaching and loss of living space. those removed cameras are proving to be so valuable to give us an insight into wildlife we've never seen before. -- grimaud cameras. and you can see the spots really clearly because normally the patterns don't come through until later. everyone is unique! —— remote cameras. let's get more about the disturbance at swaleside prison. peter whittlesea is there. what do we know about what was going on inside there last night? the prison service is saying that a wing needed to be controlled and that was confined to one landing and the prison service is saying around 1am this morning
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the inmates surrendered and went back into their cells. this is after these specialist officers, specialist guards called tornado squads went in in riot vans and they are specially trained in restraint and control. the prison service are saying no staff or inmates were injured when this happened. yesterday evening i was outside the prison and you could clearly hear inmates banging from inside and there were also fire crews and ambulances on standby outside. peter, for now, thank you very much indeed. back to peter during the morning as we get more details from swaleside. we're going to get a christmas forecast form carol, but we have to be aware of storm barbara affecting the north. john is here with the sport. and a sacking in the premier league. what a christmas present to have!
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and you're a crystal palace fan? i'm from south london originally so you have to stick with your roots. happy or sad about alan pardew? i'm sad because not a good christmas for him. what a time to go! but if your tea m him. what a time to go! but if your team doesn't perform. one win in 11 matches. at least he gets a good break. time to do the christmas shopping! crystal palace say they will move quickly to replace alan pardew who was sacked afterjust one win in 11 matches. pardew leaves the club just one place above the relegation zone. he led palace to the fa cup final in may but aside from that run, their form in the league is the worst of all 92 premier league and english football league clubs. former england manager sam allardyce is the frontrunner to replace him in a bid to stave off relegation. he managed to keep sunderland up last season and has never been relegated as a manager. other potential candidates include another former england manager roy hodgson and the wales
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manager chris coleman. former jockeyjohn buckingham, who won the 1967 grand national on board foinavon, has died at the age of 76. one of the best known names in racing history, foinavon won the grand national as a 100—1 outsider. he was the only horse to escape a mass fall at the 23rd fence, one that still bears his name today. and dave ‘chizzy‘ chisnall survived a scare to make it through to the second round of the pdc world darts championship. he almost went two sets down to the 22—year—old littlejohn robyjohn rodriguez but fought back to level the match and secured the win with this 11 dart leg. well done to him!
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it has been a while since i have heard some good darts names. are you into surfing? a fantastic picture on the front page of the times, northern ireland yesterday afternoon. as storm barbara approached. is that the first thing you do? he looks terrified. the lead story on the times claims the queen is frustrated by the fact to reason may‘s government is being so secretive about its brexit plans. theresa may says we can't play our cards to ellie and have to be secretive because this is about negotiation —— too early. her majesty is getting frustrated. we will go back to the front pages in a sec. barbara winds—arrgh, i like that. according to this guy, you see
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those storms and stand there with your surfboard. an amazing sight. they are comparing pitches in sussex. loads of fog in sussex. a tiny gorgeous rainbow in a moment of calm. i would like to see whether he went in or not. i bet he beat a hasty retreat out of there. he probably did. let's catch up with the front pages. the telegraph have a story that some students in the united kingdom have got some no—go zones forjewish students —— some universities. we will take a look at the daily mail as well. civil serva nts the daily mail as well. civil servants who dole out foreign aid billions pay themselves more than any other ministry. the daily mail says that richard's bloated foreign aid department now hints at the highest salaries in whitehall —— britain. pen pushers at the
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department have a wage of more than £53,000 a year average. dramatic picture on the front page of the mirror. it claims this is a vaping explosion, that in e—cigarette exploded at a shop in leeds yesterday in front of a baby in a pushchair. asking questions about their safety and calling for an investigation. we spoke about alan pardew. what else is going on? he will not be working over christmas. for anyone who is, that includes sir ben ainsley, who is working in the bahamas. nice work. as you can imagine. preparing for the assault on the america's cup. he has decamped to bermuda as he begins the preparation and training. you can't begrudge him that because you just know how hard he works.“ begrudge him that because you just know how hard he works. if you are going to be working anywhere, why not in bermuda? are you working christmas day? anybody else?
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bermuda? later. wouldn't that be nice. john, thank you. i don't think the weather is much like bermuda. carol joins the weather is much like bermuda. caroljoins us from covent garden. good morning. it is lovely and in covent garden. 45 beautiful mistletoe chandeliers with 700 glistening berries on them. i pointed that out to our cameramen this morning, look at this mistletoe, and he was straight down the street. hopefully he comes back said. the weather is not very festive. storm barbara is on our shores —— comes back soon. there is an ember weather warning for wind. especially for scotland, the northern isles with gusts of up to 90 mph. that could cause structural damage and also some travel
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disruption. but where ever you are, we are looking at strong winds today. across scotland are not a cloud, heavy rain pushing across. —— under a cloud. some of the rain getting into north—western england as well. towards east anglia and down towards ken, it is dry. dry the midlands, and then towards the south—west of england, largely dry —— kent. drizzle here and there. a dry start across wales. winter picking up along the coastline. into northern ireland, rain is moving in, and strengthening winds. the strongest winds this morning will be across the western isles. through the day, winds will pick up across northern ireland, scotland and northern england. gusts between 60 and 80 mph. 90 in the north. for the rest of england and wales, still windier than it has been, but they will arrive later, the strongest
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winds, as the rain comes out. behind the band of rain, a return to squally showers, some of which will be wintry with thunder and lightning and hail them. through the evening, with these range from the south—east. clear skies across southern areas. for the north of the country, we continue with squally showers. wintry winds and snow insulating on the hills. suite at lower levels. very windy across the far north. —— snow. for wales, there will be sunshine around. we persist with some of those squally showers in the north, and later, rain coming in as well from the west. parts of scotland, northern ireland, northern england and northern wilds. for christmas day, we have a weather front sinking south, and that will have bring in it —— northern wilds. across southern counties of england and wales, a dark start, but it will
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brighten. then the wider front —— weather front console. mist date where ever you are. we might even see a record breaking temperatures. we have to beat 15.6dc. somewhere could hit 16. if it is somewhere like aberdeen, then we could have the highest temperatures recorded on christmas day. as the weather front goes through, cold air follows behind. we could even see wintry mess. we could also have a white christmas before christmas day is there. loads is happening with the weather over the next few days, especially windy across the north of the country for the next few days. i can't believe there's temperatures for sunday. you will not need your scarf and gloves then. not on sunday. but on christmas day. but you do this morning, john. we have been won. i like the scarf. but she
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will be sweating on christmas day. it is six months to the day since one of the biggest decisions in uk politics — the vote to leave the eu. it feels longer than that. a lot has happened in six months. with two days until christmas, our special breakfast panel have arranged to meet up for a festive lunch and talk through their reaction to the vote, and the progress made so far. everyone has brought their own brexit—themed dessert including a red, white and blue cheeseboa rd, and a "have your cake and eat it" sponge! breakfast‘s graham satchell reports. we start serving in about two minutes, take the tricky out. this was the deal. a polish rest assure cooks the main meal and the brexit panel brings desert —— that matter. we have the sponge cake, which is ta ke
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we have the sponge cake, which is take back control of our borders. we have the sponge cake, which is take back control of our borderslj have take back control of our borders.” have bought k. already different countries in the european union are trying to purge our businesses. we have costed to take control of £359 a week. -- custard. i bought an occupier. this is especially for all of those brits in the uk who think you can have your cake and eat it.” think brexit is bananas. we are going to get a red, white and blue brexit, whatever that means. very tasty. my wife made it. britain voted to leave the eu six months ago today. our brexit panel is split 50-50, today. our brexit panel is split 50—50, half in and half out. time for a cracker. brexit means... it is difficult because we don't know what the plane is. for example, the red, white and blue, what does that mean?
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that isjust a soundbite that means absolutely nothing. the uk has been accused of dragging their feet. had we know what is going on? accused of dragging their feet. had we know what is going omfl accused of dragging their feet. had we know what is going on? it is not public knowledge. when you get johnson and nigel farage and so on insulting these countries and the project, to be honest... you can be respectful for the promised of the country. one that you negotiate and outre deals with. that went well. time for another crack? free trade, discuss. if we are going to be in the single market, we have to accept free movement of people, part of the four principles of the eu. free movement of labour is not necessarily the problem, it is the free movement of people, which is a huge difference. healthcare, if we sent all of those carers out tomorrow, the whole social care...
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what they want to do is control the situation. the point of controlling it so that we can plan our citizenship. but big borders open, how can we plan our infrastructure? immigration, i don't think it will be stopped. you can't stop it. oh, dear. do we dare one final cracker? what have we got? all i want for christmas... what i would like for christmas... what i would like for christmas would be a british agricultural policy so that we are actually able to promote british produce. what i want for christmas, for people to understand we polish are happy in this country, and whatever happen good about the uk, make me happy. -- polish. so our panel and is make me happy. -- polish. so our paneland is in make me happy. -- polish. so our panel and is in agreement, roll on
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article 50 and the start of negotiations. brea kfast‘s graham satchell with that report, and we'd like to say a special thanks to sheffield university for hosting our brexit panel christmas dinner. it surprised me when i found out it was filmed there. it looked a bit posh to me, not like i remembered. the canteen at my university was nothing like that. but it was a while ago. things have changed. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: if you're planning to pick up your turkey and sprouts today, you won't be the only one. i thought of going to a supermarket today... it scares me witless. ben's out at a supermarket for us this morning, on what's predicted to be the busiest food shopping day of the year. good morning. good morning. i drew the short store this morning. i have your wrists, and the sprouts are
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coming —— short straw. good morning from commentary, we are doing last—minute christmas shopping. people coming in to pick up the last minute things. sprouts, carrots, potatoes, all for the christmas shop. it is expected to be the busiest shopping day of the entire year. this place is a 24—hour supermarket. the aisles are full. it is not even 6:30 this morning. the 11 o'clock time this money is expected to be busiest, when they are expecting most people through the doors picking up all of this sort of stuff. in the uk, we go a little bit crazy this time of year. 0n little bit crazy this time of year. on average, a family spends about £800 on their christmas shopping, much than anyone else. about double the european average. it is making sure all of this stuff is in the shops and on the shelves at the
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right time. this placed on ebay have run out of tinsel already. today it is all about the fresh food produce —— have told me they have run out of. we will be joined —— have told me they have run out of. we will bejoined by —— have told me they have run out of. we will be joined by a turkish farmer about how they get everything on the shelves like this. —— turkey. while i'll leave you to get on with what you are doing this morning, i would do the rest of the shopping, but before that, let's get the news, travel and weather will you are. —— where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. chelsea football club has been cleared of breaking any premier league rules in their handling of historical sex abuse claims made by former player garyjohnson. the club has apologised "profusely" to him over abuse he suffered as a youth team member in the 19705. the 57—year—old revealed the club paid him £50,000 to keep quiet about allegations against former chief scout eddie heath. the premier league said chelsea broke no rules by not reporting the allegations, made in 2014.
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it's been revealed that consumers will spend significantly less this year on christmas than last. that is according to sainsbury‘s bank. retailers will be hoping for a bumper christmas eve, which falls this year on a saturday. 0ne retail analyst says spending is simply down to the individual‘s budget. it is really the household budget that affects how people make their day—to—day spending decisions, so things like interest rates, if you are paying more or less on your mortgage will change how much you have in your monthly budget to spend, but that you have to do more or fewer hours at work because of the state of the economy. that will really impact on your household budget. let's have a look at the travel situation now. firstly the tubes — some good news there — all lines running well at the moment. we have no reported problems on the
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trains, but a we have no reported problems on the trains, buta reminder we have no reported problems on the trains, but a reminder that after today, there will be no great western services from paddington. there is lots of engineering work over the christmas period. the advice is to plan ahead and travel early. to the roads now. and in turnpike lane, westbury avenue is closed between the tube station and hawke park road following a stabbing there. let's find out your all important christmas forecast now with georgina burnett. if you place it on a white christmas you may be disappointed. it is looking out over the next few days, possibly even breaking records. for today, a bit of mr bulkley early, and then it brightens up. a fair amount of cloud at times. —— mist around early. around 12 celsius and largely dry into the late afternoon. strengthening winds as well. that rainy coming through will become heavily through the night, so
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coupled with winds of up to 50 mph, a grotty night to come. temperatures down to four or five degrees. for christmas eve, a largely dry and bright day. fairly breezy, but still quite pleasant if you do need to get any of those last—minute shopping trips in. temperatures up to nine or 10 celsius. 0vernight, the wind strengthened. breezy on christmas day. still mild, and in the morning, a little bit of drizzle, but drying and brightening for the afternoon. if you like to go for a post— christmas day walk, you could be in luck for data on in the day. generally speaking, decent temperatures for this time of year —— for that on the day. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning:
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the big christmas getaway begins in earnest for many of us today. we'll have all the latest on the roads, railways and airports after 7am. we've been lucky enough to meet some incredibly inspirational people here on breakfast this year and we've brought some of them back today, we'll catch up with them after 8am. and it's certainly a day for old friends, because naga will be reunited with her strictly dance partner pasha kovalev before 9am. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news: the prison service says specialist guards have resolved a disturbance at swaleside jail in kent, the fourth major incident at an english prison in less than two months. fires were lit when around 60 inmates took control of part of one wing yesterday evening, but they were returned to their cells overnight. we'll have more from there
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throughout the morning. in a few minutes' time we'll be talking to the chair of the prison 0fficers' association. two men have been arrested in germany on suspicion of planning an attack on a shopping centre near the dutch border. the brothers were detained early this morning. germany is on high alert after monday's market attack in berlin, which left 12 people dead. authorities have issued an arrest—warrant for tunisian man anis amri, whose fingerprints were found in the truck which ploughed into crowds. catriona renton has more. caught on a taxi's dashboard—mounted camera, the moment the lorry ploughed into the christmas market. the footage has been slowed down. 12 people were killed, and dozens more were injured. you can see people flee. this is anis amri, filming himself, humming a tune in berlin, a video posted to his facebook page in september. the 24—year—old is now europe's most wanted man. first, his id documents
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were found in the cab, then his fingerprints were discovered on the driver's door and inside the lorry. raids at the addresses of anis amri's known contacts in germany turned up nothing. his family in tunisia last saw him five years ago. they say he wasn't religious, drank alcohol, and dreamed of owning a car and starting a business. his mother spoke to reporters. translation: i have four sons, including him, and i think we will not be counting him anymore. the news is very bad. we want to know the truth, if it was really him who did this, and then we will all punish him. germany's security services remain on high alert. last night police arrested two brothers, originally from kosovo, suspected of planning an attack on a shopping mall in the western city of 0berhausen. it is not clear whether the alleged plot was in any way connected with monday's attack in berlin.
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now the breitscheidplatz market is back up and running. it is a show from berlin is of defiance, strength and not giving in as the investigation into what happened here continues. catriona renton, bbc news. the syrian army has declared victory in aleppo. the east of the city had been held by rebels for more than four years, becoming a symbol of the opposition to president assad. state media said the last convoy taking rebel fighters and civilians had left. in a statement on syrian tv, an army commander said they would now liberate the rest of the country. 12 million drivers are expected on the roads today as the christmas getaway continues. this weekend also sees 200 sets of rail engineering works across the uk. services mainly affected are in and out of london, manchester and cardiff but it will be busy however you travel over the festive period. drivers are likely to face tailbacks
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while record numbers of people are expected to pass though airports across britain as they leave the country for christmas and new year. the government is injecting £60 million a year to help first—time buyers get a foot on the housing ladder in areas where locals are crowded out of the market by second home owners. housing minister gavin barwell said the cash would be channelled through local councils to community—led groups providing affordable housing. the south—west will receive the most funding. it's too little, it's too late and it's not helping bejust it's too little, it's too late and it's not helping be just about managing and the people who have no hope of ever being able to get on the housing ladder. giving money to first—time buyers only increases the prices of new homes, it doesn't actually tackle the affordable housing crisis that we have in this country at the moment. the consumer group which? has begun legal action to strengthen protection for the owners of tumble dryers that pose a fire risk.
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five million of the affected creda, indesit and hotpoint machines were sold in the 11 years to 2015. the owner of the brands, whirpool, is carrying out a repair programme. but which believes the trading standards team handling the case should be doing more. john is here with the sport, and a managerial casualty in the premier league. being sacked just before christmas, i think that is brutal! look at that face! a perfectly glum photo of alan pardew, the second casualty of the season so far and a couple of days out from christmas, christmas has come early... 0r out from christmas, christmas has come early... or it hasn't. but if you're going to lose eight out of 12 games. he's only won one of his last 11 matches. not a great run and one place above the relegation zone, big owners, you need big performances, they're not getting that and picking up they're not getting that and picking up points and the reality is, in
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top—flight football, if you're not getting the results you have to be worried. who's next? who knows, we will talk about that in a moment, maybe they have done that because there are potential candidates waiting in the wings that could provide the results crystal palace wa nt provide the results crystal palace want at the moment. premier league side crystal palace have sacked manager alan pardew afterjust one win in 11 matches. pardew leaves the club just one place above the relegation zone. he led palace to the fa cup final in may but their form in the league in 2016 is the worst of all 92 premier league and english football league clubs. former england manager sam allardyce is the favourite to try to get them out of the relegation scrap. he did just that at sunderland last season. other potential candidates include another former england manager roy hodgson and the wales manager chris coleman. two—time wimbledon champion petra kvitova will be released from hospital today following a knife attack during a burglary at her home. kvitova needed surgery on her left hand and will miss at least six months of tennis.
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she said on tuesday she was fortunate to be alive. she's due to speak to the media this afternoon. former jockeyjohn buckingham who won the 1967 grand national on board foinavon had died at the age of 76. on board foinavon, has died at the age of 76. one of the best known names in racing history, foinavon won the grand national as a 100—1 outsider. he was the only horse to escape a mass fall at the 23rd fence, one that still bears his name today, because he was trailing so far behind at the time. of the 44 starters, only 18 horses finished. dave ‘chizzy‘ chisnall had a scare against ‘littlejohn‘ roby—john rodriguez but made it through to the second round of the pdc world darts championship at alexandra palace.
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the seventh seed almost went two sets down to the 22—year—old from austria, but at 2—2 he wrapped up the match with an 11 dart leg. always a great scene at the ally pally for the darts. you know it's christmas. you can see it, the run up christmas. you can see it, the run upfor christmas. you can see it, the run up for christmas and the final is on the second of january. up for christmas and the final is on the second ofjanuary. expect up for christmas and the final is on the second of january. expect more wild scenes at the ally pally. and crazy names. that's the game, you make up your own names. of that game. let's return now to that incident on the isle of sheppey, where up to 60 inmates temporarily took control of a wing of swaleside prison last night. it's the fourth major disturbance at an english jail in less than two months, prompting concerns over safety of both staff and prisoners. we can speak now to chair of the prison officers association, mike rolfe, who is outside swaleside prison this morning. thank you forjoining us. let's talk
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about the latest disturbance. how significant and serious was it, what do we know happened? 0f significant and serious was it, what do we know happened? of it was quite a violent incident, as you would expect, prisoners taking control of the wing is never a situation we wa nt to the wing is never a situation we want to be in and they were able to cause a fair amount of damage to the wing. but we have to commend the staff, they were able to contain the prisoners into one area of the wing before they had to retreat for their own safety. was it a surprise it would happen at this particular prison? no, not really. there are similar simmering tensions around the estate, what happened at swaleside last night we believe could happen at any number of prisons up and down the country at any time but swaleside is a particularly tough prison to work at. the staff recruitment and retention has been poor over the last two years, they've lost lots of experienced staff and new recruits haven't wanted to stick the drop out because of the toxic nature of the job. the job that you're all doing,
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toxic. what could have prevented this from happening, could anything have prevented it? absolutely. the government should have resourced prisons properly. we've been warning for over six years of the incident is likely to happen in our prisons and it's coming to fruition now. they didn't heed our concerns when we warned them early enough and they aren't listening now so they need to buck up and start listening to what we're saying and hopefully we can avoid similar incidents to what happened here last night. they say they're listening happened here last night. they say they‘ re listening and happened here last night. they say they're listening and acting and they're listening and acting and they have this in hand and their reforming the way prisons work, they say that's under way and there will be incidents but we should be thinking about the future and dealing with this? about i refused that a little bit actually to be fair because all we've heard from ministers is big, bold statements up until now. -- i refused. we've been recruiting en masse for two years.
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—— refute. they tell us they want to recruit up to 8000 prison officers in the next two years to replace the gaps currently there, the people leaving, and also to bring up these 2500 but they're really not offering any packages or incentives to get people to work in prisons. when you see incidents like the one last night, why would you want to work in the prison service unless it's an attractive package? when you hear there's been an incident like the one last night, inside you you secretly think, this isn't a bag thing because it backs up our argument and gives us a platform to say what we want and promote our own cause “— say what we want and promote our own cause —— bad thing. say what we want and promote our own cause -- bad thing. absolutely not. 0bviously cause -- bad thing. absolutely not. obviously we are a responsible trade union, our members are a very responsible and professional set of people and we care deeply about the service we run. but we need to highlight to the public that we haven't been supported and funded properly and the only way to turn that around is to get the right
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investment in place and we need to get that message across clear to government that we will see more incidents like this unless they start to listen, but we don't want this to be happening. we want our prisons to be safe and we want them to be places of reform where we can turn the lights around of prisoners and we want them to be safe as well. do you think this will be more common in the weeks to come —— the lives of. there's every chance of that and i would really like to appeal to prisoners on that basis. what their actions are doing is probably making the situation worse for themselves. prisoners watching this programme, it would be useful if they understood that by keeping a good working relationship with staff, things will get easier and better over time as we work with the government to bring improvements. you're right, at the moment we are fea rful you're right, at the moment we are fearful about copycat incidents and other incidents around the estate. there's nothing in place to stop that at this minute in time. mike,
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from the prison 0fficers association, thank you forjoining us. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the prison service says part of a prison wing on the isle of sheppey that was taken over by about 60 inmates has been reclaimed. officers in germany have arrested two brothers on suspicion of planning to attack one of the country's biggest shopping centres in 0berhausen, near the dutch border. it is time to get in the mood for christmas. lights, cameras, action. good morning. good morning. we have it all going on. look at this fabulous norwegian spruce christmas tree. it is lovely. how many baubles do you think are on mystery? we are a lwa ys do you think are on mystery? we are always paying attention —— this tree? i will go 126. 126? i think
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2000. really? there are over 200 baubles, but there are over 20,000 lives. it is gorgeous. it is the largest and feet christmas tree in london. the weather is not very festive this morning. —— handpicked christmas tree. there is an amber warning for wind. the strongest winds will be the further north and west to travel, at the highest guts is -- west to travel, at the highest guts is —— gusts will be across the northern isles. up to 90 mph. likely to be damaging, and wherever you are, it will be windy. take note. across scotland at nine o'clock, we have rainy coming south—east. some will be heavy with hill snow. that same rain getting in across england.
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right down to kent into the midlands towards hampshire, it is dry. 0ne right down to kent into the midlands towards hampshire, it is dry. one or two showers, but they are the exception rather than the rule. into south—west england, a lot of dry weather. for wales, a lot of dry weather. for wales, a lot of dry weather. the wind is picking up by nine o'clock. for northern ireland, you have the same band of rain heading south—east across scotland. and strengthening winds. the strongest winds will be this morning across the western isles. through the day as the weather front moves south—eastwards, squally winds around that rain. the winds will be producing surface water and spray. it will get down to the south—east by dusk. behind it, a return to some squally showers, some of which will be wintry with hail and thunder and hill snow, and sleet at low levels. 0vernight, the squally showers continue. it will still be windy with severe gales across the final.
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clear skies behind train across much of england and wales. tomorrow morning, christmas eve dawns under clear skies on a sunny note for the large trunk of england and was. squally showers continuing across northern ireland and scotland, and through the day, a band of rain coming across northern ireland and scotland, sinking into northern england and north wales. tomorrow will not be as when the further south, but it will be still windy in the north, just not as windy as today. as we head into christmas day, we start on a drizzly note across southern day, we start on a drizzly note across southern areas. day, we start on a drizzly note across southern areas. it will brighten, but we do have a weather front moving across scotland, northern ireland and into england. it will continue south. after a bright start, the rain will come through. behind the band of rain, we are looking at caldaire coming our way. before it comes south, temperatures in the mud category for
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this time of year —— cold air. we could have record—breaking temperatures in some parts of the country on christmas day. we could hit something like 16 celsius in aberdeen. if that happens, it will be the highest temperature recorded on christmas day. as the cold front goes through, colder air follows behind, and it looks like somewhere like aberdeen or in the highlands may see a white christmas. that is unusual to have the highest temperature recorded and then a white christmas all in the same day. it is absolutely bizarre. i would have thought it would be too warm for snow with those temperatures. i know you like winter being winter. this is not your ideal temperature for christmas. no, i like to be cold and crisp. i would love snow. we are more likely to get snow at easter if it falls early than christmas. it looks very quiet there at home and garden. don't do that, people will
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flood there now.! covent garden. you can only see what is on the side of the camera. it is lovely and peaceful. it will be heaving later on, i'm sure. give it an hour. see you soon. on, i'm sure. give it an hour. see you soon. it will be heaving pretty much everywhere. it is the busiest food shopping day of the year. an estimated 10 million people will be hitting the supermarkets. we need someone hitting the supermarkets. we need someone to do our shopping for christmas. he volunteered, i'm sure. good morning. how come i drew the short straw and came down here? 10 million expected
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to hit the supermarkets over the course of the day to make sure we have everything we need. gary and suzanne are with me. you have a lot in your trolley already. what do you still need? in your trolley already. what do you still need ? everything. in your trolley already. what do you still need? everything. i have my vegeta bles still need? everything. i have my vegetables and everything organised in very. —— theory. vegetables and everything organised in very. -- theory. any last-minute bargains as well. do you always leave at this way? i normally don't. this is unusual for me. who is usually responsible? i am, but circumstances are different. hilliard. i have someone to push the trolley and unload everything —— brilliant. have a good christmas. what do people need? why are people here? this is a 24—hour so they have been here all night. claire is with me. i need an expert. good morning. how important is today for shoppers
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and the supermarkets? with the four day weekend coming, because of the way christmas man city, it may be the last opportunity before they are spending family time to do their fresh food shopping. for the supermarkets, this is the big day. people buying their fresh fruit and vegeta bles people buying their fresh fruit and vegetables and meat. it is an opportunity to maximise sales. running out of stock is not an option. 0verstocking is not an option. 0verstocking is not an option either because could go out of date by boxing day. they have to get this right, because they will have to get rid of it cheap and make a loss. but they don't want to see empty shelves with people coming in. there is a whole army of head office staff behind the retail operation at the store planning the products and a daily basis and making sure the depots are fully stocked and the deliveries are outbound and the store staff, there is an army of people today, filling up the shelves so people today, filling up the shelves so when people today, filling up the shelves so when customers come people today, filling up the shelves so when customers come round today,
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they will not mist out on the opportunity to get their turkey or vegeta bles opportunity to get their turkey or vegetables for the big day. ! miss out. edward is a turkey farmer. good to see you. you know all about this. when did you start planning for this time of year? we have to order our turkey early based on sales from last year. how many do you sell on average? 2000 turkeys. we do about 1700 one raised and about 300 free range. for people who have turkey at home, top tip to cook at this christmas? for the first hour of cooking time, put it upside down so the breast meat soaks in the juices, then turn it over an hour later so it is nice and moist and you don't have dried turkey. thank you. we will chat to you later. i have most things you set me up for this morning. i have the crackers,
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wrapping paper, sprouts, so let me know if there is anything else. i am not coming back here again later. everybody needs cranberries, apparently. you better go back down there. 0k. apparently. you better go back down there. ok. see you in a bit. he is so there. ok. see you in a bit. he is so good with the shopping. very good. we will talk to him again later. those turkey tips, we have the winner of masterchef two. —— as well. throughout the year we've had all sorts of famous people on the breakfast sofa — politicians, performers and personalities, but more often than not the stories that touch us and you at home the most are the stories of ordinary people doing quite extraordinary things. let's take a look. music plays
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we knew we were going to get here. we knew we were going to get here. we are so proud of what we have done. would you say you have a positive attitude? yes. ijust have an attitude. who has inspired you of the guests you have met and seen this year? you
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have interviewed a lot of people. you have met and seen this year? you have interviewed a lot of peoplem is really difficult to pick someone. i was asked this last night. he first person that popped into my head was nick skelton, the horse jumping champion. at the age of 58, this year, he won gold at the 0lympics. his seventh 0lympic this year, he won gold at the 0lympics. his seventh olympic games. the year i was born, in 1975, he was taking to team silvers, and 58, he has come back from numerous injuries and smashed it gold. ijust remember his face when he received that medal, and the emotion in his face. i thought, his absolute proof that if you stick to something, you stay passionate about something, you can achieve anything. i feel emotional talking about. and seeing him at the ibc sports personality of the year. mine is ben smith, during the marathon is to raise charity. it was
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nice to meet him this year. —— bbc. so this morning we're asking who or what has insprired you? and we will be joined by some old friends of bbc breakfast this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. chelsea has been cleared by the premier league of breaching its rules, in the way the club handled claims of sexual abuse. garyjohnson — a youth team player in the 19705 — was paid £50,000 last year and signed a confidentiality agreement, after making allegations about the former chief scout, eddie heath. the club has apologised for what it calls his unacceptable suffering in the 19705. the league 5aid chelsea hadn't broken any rules by not reporting the allegations. the scale of violence suffered by people sleeping on the street
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here in the capital has been revealed in new research from the homelessness charity. in london, more than 8 out of 10 rough sleepers have suffered some sort of violence, abuse or anti—social behaviour in the past year, according to crisis. the consequences are immense, especially on the mental health of those individuals. we find in our senses people quite subdued, quiet, not wanting to talk about what has happened to them. that puts that person even further away from a solution —— centres. let's have a look at the travel situation now. minor delays on the circle line and district line on the tube today. we have no reported problems on the trains, but a reminder that after today, there will be no great western services from paddington. the last trains are earlier than usual on christmas eve.
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there is lots of engineering work over the christmas period. the advice is to plan ahead and travel early. to the roads now. and in turnpike lane, westbury avenue is closed between the tube station and hawke park road following a stabbing there. let's find out your all important christmas forecast now with georgina burnett. good morning. if you placed bets on a white christmas this year, you may be sorely disappointed as it's looking very mild over the next few days, and possibly even breaking records. for today, a bit of mist that will clear fairly early, and then it brightens up. a fair amount of cloud at times. not much in the way of sunshine. still fairly bright today. mild with temperatures around 11 or 12 celsius, and largely dry into the late afternoon. we will have strengthening winds as well. that rain coming through will become heavy through the night, so coupled with gusts of up to 40—50 mph, a fairly grotty night to come. temperatures down to four or five degrees. for christmas eve tomorrow, a largely dry and bright day. fairly breezy, but still quite pleasant if you do need to get any of those last—minute
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shopping trips in. temperatures up to nine or ten degrees celsius. 0vernight, the winds strengthen again. breezy on christmas day. still mild, and in the morning, a little bit of drizzle, but drying and brightening up for the afternoon. if you like to go for a post—christmas day lunch walk, you could be in luck for luck later on in the day. generally speaking, decent temperatures for this time of year. now, though, it's back to naga and john. bye for now. are area hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. prison guards are back in control as a disturbance at swaleside in kent is brought to an end. 60 inmates were involved. it's the fourth major incident at an english prison in less than two months. good morning, it's friday
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the 23rd december. also this morning: a country on high alert. two men are arrested on terror charges in germany as the hunt continues for the man responsible for the attack on a christmas market. sometimes i think, he's lying in a ditch somewhere. it's heartbreaking. the strain on families and police when people with dementia go missing. in the last of our policing britain series we hear about one way to help find them. delays and disruption are expected as millions of people hit the roads, rails and skies before christmas. and it's going to be busy in the shops too. 10 million of us are expected to hit the supermarkets today to get the last minute christmas shopping. so what do you
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need to know to survive this shopping chaos? i'll have all the details. crystal palace are looking for a new manager after sacking alan pardew after just one win in 11 matches. he leaves the club sitting just above the relegation zone. and carol has the christmas forecast in a lovely, festive location. good morning. a very festive scene this morning in covent garden. we've even got a glitter ball in the honour of pacha as he will be on later. windy wherever you are, gusts between 40 and 50 mph, the strongest gusts the further north and west you are, 80 mph forsome gusts the further north and west you are, 80 mph for some areas and 90 mph in the far north of scotland. more in 15 minutes. certainly some bizarre weather out there! thanks very much, carol. good morning, first our main story. the prison service says specialist guards have resolved a disturbance at swaleside jail in kent, the fourth major incident at an english prison
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in less than two months. around 60 inmates took control of part of one wing yesterday evening, but were returned to their cells overnight. 0ur reporter peter whittlesea is outside swaleside prison for us this morning. hi, peter. iguess hi, peter. i guess you're beginning to get a sense of what went on behind the doors there. what are you learning? a clearer sense of what happened last night is coming to light. the prison 0fficers association are saying there were disputes yesterday between inmates and prison staff over how many hours people will be locked up over christmas and also raids of cells we re christmas and also raids of cells were personal possessions were then confiscated. they said after that a riot broke out and during that police then... the prison officers realised they lost control and retreated. when they retreated the
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riots took place. video footage of the riot has emerged. inmates covered their faces, brandishing snooker balls, which are often used as weapons, thrown at prison officers, and they also let of fire extinguishers. after that these special tornado teams trained in restraint and control were brought into the prison and the prison service said that by 1am this morning the wing was under control and no members of staff all prisoners were injured. peter, thank you very much indeed. —— bath or prisoners. —— staff or prisoners. two men have been arrested in germany on suspicion of planning an attack on a shopping centre near the dutch border. the brothers were detained early this morning. germany is on high alert after monday's attack in berlin, which left 12 people dead. authorities have issued an arrest—warrant for tunisian man anis amri, whose fingerprints were found in the truck which ploughed into crowds.
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catriona renton has more. caught on a taxi's dashboard—mounted camera, the moment the lorry ploughed into the christmas market. the footage has been slowed down. 12 people were killed, and dozens more were injured. you can see people flee. this is anis amri, filming himself, humming a tune in berlin, a video posted to his facebook page in september. the 24—year—old is now europe's most wanted man. first, his id documents were found in the cab, then his fingerprints were discovered on the driver's door and inside the lorry. raids at the addresses of anis amri's known contacts in germany turned up nothing. his family in tunisia last saw him five years ago. they say he wasn't religious, drank alcohol, and dreamed of owning a car and starting a business. his mother spoke to reporters. translation: i have four sons, including him, and i think we will not be counting him anymore.
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the news is very bad. we want to know the truth, if it was really him who did this, and then we will all punish him. germany's security services remain on high alert. last night police arrested two brothers, originally from kosovo, suspected of planning an attack on a shopping mall in the western city of 0berhausen. it is not clear whether the alleged plot was in any way connected with monday's attack in berlin. now the breitscheidplatz market is back up and running. it is a show from berliners of defiance, strength and not giving in as the investigation into what happened here continues. catriona renton, bbc news. the syrian army has declared victory in aleppo. the east of the city had been held by rebels for more than four years, becoming a symbol of the opposition to president assad. state media said the last convoy taking rebel fighters and civilians had left. in a statement on syrian tv,
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an army commander said they would now liberate the rest of the country. if you're planning a christmas getaway, expect a delay or two. this weekend sees major engineering works begin on rail—lines in and out of london, manchester and cardiff. airports across britain are experiencing the busiest festive travel getaway ever, with more of us planning to leave the country than ever before over christmas and new year. drivers are also likely to face tailbacks. 0ur reporter frankie mccamley, who is atjunction 10 on the m6 for us this morning. there have been quite a few busy days with lots going to work as well, but plenty getting away as well? yes, naga, and it's getting quite busy on the roads this morning. the m6 where we are standing is one of the busiest and most important motorways in the
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country, it links london to places like manchester, birmingham and roads up into scotland. this area is especially busy because you get lots of motorways merging so you get a bit of a bottleneck. around 12 million people are expected to take to the roads today. there are things to the roads today. there are things to help ease congestion, 450 miles of road works are being taken down but the strikes on the rails and the planes may make more people take their cars. the advice is that your travel time may be longer than planned so take extra supplies, take water and food with you so you can get to where you're planning to go this christmas on time. sensible words! thanks, frankly, we will speak to you later. —— frankie. we're joined now by mark carne, chief executive of network rail, who is at london paddington station for us this morning. it sounds like paddington in and out
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becomes a bit of an issue from later tonight, is that right? we're going tonight, is that right? we're going to be shutting paddington later tonight for the next six days to allow us to do some of the huge improvement works that we need to do to allow crossrail to happen. there will be other stations that will be closing over the next few days as well. it's really important people checked before they travel so they can make their journeys successfully. it's been a terrible few weeks on the railways with strikes and delays on macro southern. how are you going to reassure passengers that it's not going to be a nightmare, notjust today with the getaway but for people trying to get around and home again at the end of christmas?” totally share the frustration. i think the strikes in the last few weeks have really been hugely damaging for passengers and it has blighted their lives in many cases andi blighted their lives in many cases and i hope there will be a
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resolution to that in the near future. 0ver resolution to that in the near future. over the next few days it's important to remember that 90% of the railway is still open and 90% of services will be unaffected and open, but because of this huge programme of works... we have 24,000 people out in the next few days doing these engineering works and it's important people checked to make sure theirjourney isn't going to be affected. if yourjourney is affected and you wanted to go in and out of paddington over the next six days, what do you say to those people who say why do you have to do it at christmas when people are making crucial journeys and it at christmas when people are making crucialjourneys and want to spend every moment they can with theirfamilies? spend every moment they can with their families? allowed if spend every moment they can with theirfamilies? allowed if you spend every moment they can with their families? allowed if you want to leave to head to the west country you still can, but what you have to do is go to ealing broadway, just a short distance down the track and you can catch your train from there. it's not affecting the train services going to the west country, it just services going to the west country, itjust means services going to the west country, it just means people services going to the west country, itjust means people will need to go
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toa itjust means people will need to go to a different station. were making every effort we can with our train operating colleagues to run the services in the best way we can —— we're making. the reality is this is the best time of year for us to do this kind of engineering project because the numbers of people travelling by train is about half what it is on a normal weekend or a normal day. this is the time of year when we can do this sort of work and it will have the minimum effect on the travelling public. mark, from network rail, thank you very much indeed, merry christmas and good luck! a survey of rough sleepers suggests they are 17 times more likely to be a victim of crime than the general public. the charity crisis says 80% of homeless people were attacked or suffered abuse over the past year. there are thought to be about 4,000 people sleeping rough in britain at any one time. the government is injecting £60 million a year to help first—time buyers get a foot on the housing ladder in areas
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where locals are crowded out of the market by second home owners. housing minister gavin barwell said the cash would be channelled through local councils to community—led groups providing affordable housing. the south—west will receive the most funding. it's too little, it's too late and it's not helping the just about managing and the people who have no hope of ever being able to get on the housing ladder. giving money to first—time buyers only increases the prices of new homes, it doesn't actually tackle the affordable housing crisis that we have in this country at the moment. the consumer group which? has begun legal action to strengthen protection for the owners of tumble dryers that pose a fire risk. five million of the affected creda, indesit and hotpoint machines were sold in the 11 years to 2015. the owner of the brands, whirpool, is carrying out a repair programme.
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but which believes the trading standards team handling the case should be doing more. for the first time ever a snow leopard has been recorded with four cubs. the footage has been captured on a camera trap in mongolia as part of monitoring work which began in 2011. it's the first time that quadruplet cubs have been registered. according to the world wildlife fund there are between 4,000 and 6,500 snow leopards living in the wild. the cats are threatened by poaching and loss of living space. hopefully that is 6504 mac. there is your cuddly and all picture. —— 6504! let's get the latest now on the big christmas getaway and hopefully give you all the information you need on the hotspots to steer clear of if you can.
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let's speak to the independent‘s travel editor simon calder, whojoins us now from paddington station in london. simon, we were hearing all about the trains earlier. lots of people planning on the getaway now. what do they need to be mindful of? let's start with the planes. the good news is british airways reached an agreement with unite, the union, last night meaning the cabin crew strike due to start on christmas day and run through to boxing day involving some crew at heathrow has been suspended, so no affect there. of course swissport, there ground staff... virgin atlantic pilots have a work to rule today but they said the flights won't be affected so the strikes that could cause problems are on southern rail, an overtime
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ban by drivers will affect services to and from gatwick in particular. if you're lucky enough to be going to paris, don't expect to be able to haila to paris, don't expect to be able to hail a taxi to date because they're on strike as well. simon, we spoke about what happened at paddington but are there any other issues on the railways? plenty of rail disruption. if you missed the last train to cardiff central, you will have to wait until the next one, michigan at immingham broadway. —— unless you go to ealing. norwich will be busy today because there are no trains running up because there are no trains running up to colchester, ipswich and norwich until the new year. lots of work happening around the cardiff area, and also in manchester. as normal services will be winding down on christmas eve, ahead of the
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normal two—day shutdown, there is a skeleton service of trains running in very few parts of the uk on boxing day. the buses keep going and national express comic they have more buses running on christmas day than ever before —— told me. flying will be the busiest day of the festive season at most big british airports. written, gatwick, sta nsted, airports. written, gatwick, stansted, edinburgh, airports. written, gatwick, sta nsted, edinburgh, manchester, airports. written, gatwick, stansted, edinburgh, manchester, and long queues for security —— return. —— luton. don't put snow globes in your luggage. do not take wrapped presents in your luggage because they may get unwrapped. be prepared for a bit of delay and disruption, especially if you're heading for the north of scotland. thank you for the tips, simon. have a lovely
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christmas. thank you very much. he has to bring his own presence. that is sad. that is my present. do you reckon? we have had all of these forecasts of storm barbra hitting the uk over the christmas period and how bad that will be. let's go to covent garden. carol is there with a very christmas weather. carol and storm barbra, maybe? she's not here just yet. it will be later we have the strongest winds in the south—east. we have the chandeliers and mistletoe is, 45 of those in covent garden this morning. we also have a fabulous tall christmas tree, the largest hand—picked christmas tree in london, a norwegian spruce. you can really smell it. the met office has an ember weather warning out for wind for today, especially across the north and north—west of scotland. gusts up to 90 mph
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forecast for the north of mainland scotla nd forecast for the north of mainland scotland and the northern isles. where ever you are today, it will be windy, just not as windy as that. for scotland at nine o'clock, a lot of rain coming in. hill snow and sleet at lower levels possible. that band of rain extending into north—west england. danny is coast of england, a dry start as it is across the midlands heading towards hampshire. —— down the coast. the odd shower and drizzle. that extends towards south—west england where it isa towards south—west england where it is a largely dry start. a dry start across wales. by nine o'clock, the rain starting to pick up close to the coast, and from northern ireland, the same rain affecting scotla nd ireland, the same rain affecting scotland will push across northern ireland accompanied by strengthening winds. the strongest winds today as i mentioned, the further north and west to travel. northern scotland up to 90 mph. for northern england,
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northern island and the rest of scotland, up to 80 mph. as the rain sinks south by dust, around the rain, squally winds. about 40— 50 mph. behind that band of rain, some showers across northern england, northern ireland and scotland. some will be heavy with lightning and hail. hill snow and possibly at lower levels sleet, especially in scotland. that will continue to the course of the night. although the winds will ease overnight in the north, it will be windy with severe gales in the extreme north. further south and a clearer skies, a cold night. for christmas eve under clear skies for much of england and wales, a fine start with a bright start. some shower was still persisting in the northern half of the country. later you will notice rain coming in. christmas day is interesting. it
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will still be very windy, especially across northern ireland, northern england and scotland. just not as windy as storm barbra's winds today. we have a weather front sinking south. before it comes out, it will be very mild. some dry weather, but behind it, caldaire comes in. we could hear a record—breaking temperatures for some parts on christmas day —— cold air. but later, the possibility of a white christmas. back to you. a bit of everything. see you again later. for any family with a relative who has dementia, the idea of them going missing and then needing the police's help is one of their worst nightmares. in the last of our policing britain stories, we've found that happened at least 1,200 times in the last year alone, and it looks as if the problem is getting worse, with several forces saying they're seeing increasing numbers of people with dementia going missing. jayne mccubbin reports.
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ijust thought, i just thought, oh, ijust thought, oh, my god, where easy? ijust thought, oh, my god, where 7 i ijust thought, oh, my god, where easy? i could not find him. —— where is he? i was pacing up and down until the police came. i was beside myself. terry went missing seven weeks after their wedding. in march this year, this disappearance from a holiday caravan in cumbria triggered a huge manhunt. he went missing at two pm and at two am he was still missing? yes. my thoughts were just with him, what was going to this mind. you knew he would have been distressed. yes. he could have been lying ina distressed. yes. he could have been lying in a ditch somewhere, it was heartbreaking. -- through his mind. he had no coat on and it was close to freezing. terry was eventually found ten miles away after a 13 hour search. i threw my arms around him and said, where have you been? he said, i don't know. sergeant oliver
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was part of the search party. said, i don't know. sergeant oliver was part of the search partym said, i don't know. sergeant oliver was part of the search party. it was around 60 people involving the coastguard, police, mountain rescue teams, the helicopter from lancaster, and police across different shifts. in cumbria, reports of missing people with dementia have increased by 152% since 2012. with 89 searches so far this year. police scotland said they respond to at least one report a day. they had 253 reports since april. and six has in the highest number of searches in england with 190 so far —— essex. in wales, they have created a scheme which cuts search time. it is named after a pensioner who lived here. tommy about george herbert. he was a resident here with us. he fought in the second world world and took part in the normandy landings. he was a wonder. yes, he was. the germans
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could not stop him and career. police was so frequently called to help find george around wales, they devise the herbert protocol in his name. it is a way of collecting information from nursing homes before someone goes missing. they will have details of their previous home addresses, previous places of work, what they have been talking about recently, photographs, and that information can be given to as quickly. if the weather is bad, that can save someone's life. the herbert protocol developed right here will help police find people much quicker, but the charity darter missing people says more could be done to stop them going missing. they say they should be in automatic referral to social services the first time anybody show signs of wandering. without that, they believe they are missed opportunities to protect people. terry's dementia has deteriorated
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and he is no longer able to live at home. but nursing homes are not meant to be presence. you can't lock people in. with the number of dementia sufferers set to rise to over1 million x two dozen 25, this problem is likely to become more of a problem. —— by 2025. deputy chief constable tim madgwickjoins us now. he's the national police chiefs' council lead on dementia. good morning. hearing stories like this, it is heartbreaking. i think anyone watching this morning will realise that fee you have of someone going missing. we saw the herbert procedure being put in place. we are hearing 1200 people in the last year reported missing. and it will far exceed that. we have about 1000 people a week missing nationally. 0f that, around 15% are linked to dementia or old—age. that, around 15% are linked to
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dementia or old-age. which is tragic for them and deeply worrying for theirfamilies, but for them and deeply worrying for their families, but also for you as police officers, you have other demands on their time and it is hugely time—consuming. demands on their time and it is hugely time-consuming. it is. that is why the herbert protocol was so effective. we are seeing an increase in demand and social care issues across the country are well documented. they are having an impact on policing resources, and a huge impact on the families. and on staff as well. a lot of the sadly and tragically. we are conscious we have to respond especially to the most vulnerable and elderly. how quickly can you respond? where does it lie in the pecking order of police priorities? it is pretty high up police priorities? it is pretty high up there. anyone with dementia who goes missing, said last night, would be given a high risk status. we would apply a lot of resources. if we we re would apply a lot of resources. if we were called at ten o'clock at night being told an elderly
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gentleman had gone missing, we would apply whatever resources we have. we only have a couple of hours to find them. a typical scenario is they have gone out walking with very few close. they don't dress themselves properly, they just close. they don't dress themselves properly, theyjust go out and go back to some location from ladies. they are out in the middle of the night in winter. 0nly they are out in the middle of the night in winter. only a couple of hours and the results can be tragic —— from their youth. hours and the results can be tragic -- from their youth. using mobile phones were checking —— with tracking devices makes it easy to pinpoint, but there are issues with human rights and freedom. is that something you would consider? we would consider it, but the principle is safety and security of the individual concerned. we would only to work with the consent of their carers, fairly. it is difficult in the advanced age of dementia —— family. we use technology where it is appropriate. it could be very
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useful. we are going to do some tracking work with charlotte in new york and yorkshire, where i'm from. we will look at that. it only works when you have a mobile phone. but there are other ways we can bring technology to cut down that period from when they go missing to refine them. it is misled the critical hour in any sort of response. with elderly people, especially in winter, i get eaten up very quickly -- it is winter, i get eaten up very quickly —— it is like the critical hour. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: if you're planning to pick up your turkey and sprouts today you won't be the only one. i'm not. iwould not i'm not. i would not go to a supermarket today. you are getting it delivered. ben's out at a supermarket for us this morning, on what's predicted to be the busiest food shopping day of the year. he is in his element, at the
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check—in already. he is in his element, at the check-in already. good morning. i have your cranberry sauce. you asked me for that earlier. good morning. welcome to coventry. it is the busiest shopping day of the year. 10 million of us expected to come to the supermarket today to stock up on all of those things we probably forgot. brussels sprouts going to the checkout. mince pies. they are being sold today. pigs in blankets. thousands of millions to be sold. the busiest shopping day of the year, the staff during up for it in their 24 hour supermarket. while i checkout everything you tommy to buy, i will have top tips in the next half—hour, but let's get the news, travel and weather were you at this morning —— you told me to buy. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. chelsea have been cleared of breaking any premier league rules in the way the club handled claims of historical sexual abuse. garyjohnson — a youth team player in the 19705 —
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revealed he was paid 50,000 pounds to keep quiet about allegations against its former chief scout eddie heath. the club's apologised for what it calls his "unacceptable suffering" but the league said chelsea hadn't broken any rules by not reporting the allegations. rough sleepers in london have described being urinated on, having their belongings stolen and being sexually assaulted while living on the streets. research by the homeless charity crisis found more than 8 out of 10 rough sleepers have suffered some sort of attack or abuse this year. the consequences are immense, especially on the mental health of those individuals. we find in our centres people quite subdued, quiet, not wanting to talk about what has happened to them. that puts that person even further away from a solution. now lots of you will be making your way out of london today for christmas so let's see what the travel situation
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is like at the moment. firstly the tubes — minor delays on the circle anti—clockwise. severe delays too on the district line from edgware road to earls court and earls court to tower hill. looking quiet on the trains currently — no reported problems there — butjust a reminder that the last trains are earlier than usual on christmas eve and then lots of engineering works will begin across london — so the advice is to travel early. and thurston road is partly blocked me the bus station because of a burst water main. —— near. let's find out your all important christmas forecast now with georgina burnett. good morning. if you placed bets on a white christmas this year, you may be sorely disappointed as it's looking very mild over the next few days, and possibly even breaking records. for today, a bit of mist that will clear fairly early, and then it brightens up.
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a fair amount of cloud at times. not much in the way of sunshine. still fairly bright today. mild with temperatures around 11 or 12 celsius, and largely dry into the late afternoon. we will have strengthening winds as well. that rain coming through will become heavy through the night, so coupled with gusts of up to 40—50 mph, a fairly grotty night to come. temperatures down to four or five degrees. for christmas eve tomorrow, a largely dry and bright day. fairly breezy, but still quite pleasant if you do need to get any of those last—minute shopping trips in. temperatures up to nine or ten degrees celsius. 0vernight, the winds strengthen again. breezy on christmas day. still mild, and in the morning, a little bit of drizzle, but drying and brightening up for the afternoon. if you like to go for a post—christmas day lunch walk, you could be in luck for luck later on in the day. generally speaking, decent temperatures for this time of year. time to hand you back to bbc
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brea kfast. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. the prison service says specialist guards have resolved a disturbance at swaleside jail in kent, the fourth major incident at an english prison in less than two months. fires were lit when around 60 inmates took control of part of one wing yesterday evening, but they were returned to their cells overnight. the prison service says it's committed to making sure our prisons are stable while delivering wholesale reforms. earlier on breakfast, chair of the prison 0fficers association mike rolfe said these incidents were inevitable. we've been warning for over six years of the incident is likely to happen in our prisons and it's
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coming to fruition now. they didn't heed our concerns when we warned them early enough and they aren't listening now so they need to buck up their trend now and start listening to what we're saying and hopefully we can avoid similar incidents to what happened here last night. two men have been arrested in germany on suspicion of planning an attack on a shopping centre near the dutch border. the brothers were detained early this morning germany is on high alert after monday's market attack in berlin, which left 12 people dead. authorities have issued an arrest—warrant for tunisian man anis amri, whose fingerprints were found in the truck which ploughed into crowds. 12 million drivers are expected on the roads today as the christmas getaway continues. this weekend also sees 200 sets of rail engineering works across the uk. services mainly affected are in and out of london, manchester and cardiff but it will be busy however you travel over the festive period. drivers are likely to face tailbacks while record numbers of people are expected to pass though airports across britain as they leave the country for christmas and new year. we will be talking more about the
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trouble spots and the hotspots through the programme. we will be with you right here every morning, though! the government is injecting £60 million a year to help first—time buyers get a foot on the housing ladder in areas where locals are crowded out of the market by second home owners. housing minister gavin barwell said the cash would be channelled through local councils to community—led groups providing affordable housing. the south—west will receive the most funding. the shadow housing minister says it doesn't go far enough. we were talking about people not sending christmas cards like they used to. here's a story about a young man who has an awful lot of cards operate its lovely. —— awful lot of christmas cards. it's lovely. a five—year—old boy with cancer has received over 200,000 christmas cards from members of the public. bradley lowery‘s christmas wish is to receive as many cards
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as possible and people from all around the world have responded. truckloads of mail have been delivered to his home. bradley, who has cancer, was adopted by sunderland football club as their mascot at two high profile games. that puts christmas into perspective! happy christmas and i hope the cards keep on coming. duke got to find enough cards for all of those! coming up on the programme carol will have the weather for you. john is here with the sport, and a managerial casualty in the premier league. some sympathy for anyone made redundant at the start of christmas but the team hasn't performed well and i'm sure he won't be doing too badly after redundancy but feeling pretty glum ? badly after redundancy but feeling pretty glum? he played at the club and he went on to manage them and the high point was the fa cup final
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last season. it is a shock, especially in the premier league, there is such a strong focus on managers and levels of expectations but if you're not performing well enough you can expect the sack and that's what's happened to alan pardew. premier league side crystal palace have sacked manager alan pardew afterjust one win in 11 matches. pardew leaves the club just one place above the relegation zone. he led palace to the fa cup final in may but their form in the league in 2016 is the worst of all 92 premier league and english football league clubs. former england manager sam allardyce is the favourite to try to get them out of the relegation scrap. he's got a proven track record having never been relegated as a manager, leading sunderland to safety last season. other names in the frame include another former england manager roy hodgson and the wales coach chris coleman.
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there are scottish premiership matches tonight and tomorrow but the premier league won't be back until boxing day. chelsea top the table at christmas, and every other time they've been the festive league leaders, they've gone on to win the title. this league, there are many teams that can fight for the champions league and for the title and four the europa league and for this reason it's important to continue in this way. don't stop. don't stop. try. don't stop. we know it won't be easy but we have to try to continue this way with all our strength. two—time wimbledon champion petra kvitova will be released from hospital today following a knife attack during a burglary at her home. kvitova needed surgery on her left hand and will miss at least six months of tennis. she said on tuesday she was fortunate to be alive. she's due to speak to the media this afternoon. former jockeyjohn buckingham, who won the 1967 grand national
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on board foinavon, has died at the age of 76. one of the best known names in racing history, foinavon won the grand national as a 100—1 outsider. he was the only horse to escape a mass fall at the 23rd fence, one that still bears his name today, because he was trailing so far behind at the time. of the 44 starters, only 18 horses finished. dave ‘chizzy‘ chisnall had a scare against ‘littlejohn' roby—john rodriguez but made it through to the second round of the pdc world darts championship at alexandra palace. the seventh seed almost went two sets down to the 22—year—old from austria, but at 2—2 he wrapped up the match. if you've never been to the darts at halley pali, have a look at this, this gives you a flavour of the atmosphere you can expect —— ally
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pally. a few days out from christmas, lots of singing, dancing and dressing up. who are the guys in yellow? i thought they were pudsey bear. apparently it's ali g. it has me thinking about some darts nicknames. we've got littlejohn. john long john watson, john calamity kay and naga the eagles munchetty. you are a diamond between two rough stones. i like it like that. -- naga the glamour munchetty. think about carol? there is truth about you as well and we will find out later from pasha what went on behind the scenes. i like my nickname. i don't like mondays. —— i don't like mine. it is six months to the day since one of the biggest decisions in uk politics, the vote to leave the eu.
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with two days until christmas, our special breakfast panel have arranged to meet up for a festive lunch and talk through their reaction to the vote, and the progress made so far. wait until you see what's on their menu! breakfast‘s graham satchell reports. we start serving in maybe two minutes, take the turkey out. this was the deal. damian, a polish restaurateur, and voted out, cooks the main meal, and the rest of the brexit panel brings dessert. i brought the trifle because it has four layers. i've brought poached pears. we have the sponge cake, which is take back control of our borders. i have bought cake. already different countries in the european union are trying to poach our businesses. we have custard, to take control of £359 million a week. i brought banoffee pie. it's a red, white and blue cheese board. this is especially for all of those brits in the uk who think they can have their cake and eat it.
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i think brexit is bananas. we are going to get a red, white and blue brexit, whatever that means. very tasty. my wife made it. britain voted to leave the eu six months ago today. 0ur brexit panel is split 50—50, half in and half out. time for a cracker. "brexit means..." it is difficult because we don't know what their plan is. this is the thing. for example, the red, white and blue, what does that mean? that isjust a soundbite that means absolutely nothing. the uk has been accused of dragging their feet. how do they know what is going on? how do we know what is going on? it is not public knowledge. when you get people likejohnson and nigel farage and gove openly insulting these people and countries and the project,
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to be honest... you can be respectful for the prime minister of a country. especially one that you negotiate and make trade deals with. that went well. time for another cracker? "free trade, discuss." if we're going to be in the single market, we have to accept free movement of people, part of the four principles of the eu. free movement of labour is not necessarily the problem, it is the free movement of people, which is a huge difference. take healthcare, if we sent all of those carers out tomorrow, the whole social care structure would collapse. that's not suggested. what they want to do is control the situation. no one knows what we're talking about yet. the point of controlling it is so that we can plan our infrastructure. with the borders just open, how can we plan our infrastructure? iam polish, right? immigration, i don't think it will be ever stopped.
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you can't stop it. oh, dear. do we dare one final cracker? what have we got? "all i want for christmas..." what i would like for christmas would be a british agricultural policy so that we are actually able to promote british produce. what i want for christmas, for people to understand we polish are happy in this country, and whatever happen good about the uk, make me happy. i'll drink to that. merry christmas! so our panel ends in agreement — roll on 2017, article 50 and the start of negotiations. what have you made of it all?” wonder how much agreement there will be when they meet this time next year. who knows? we're joined now by professor anand menon, director of the think tank uk in a changing europe. good morning. how have the last six
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months gone for you? frantic is the word. any more clear to you what's going to happen? 0f word. any more clear to you what's going to happen? of what is clear is this is going to be all changing, it will change our politics, the way the british state works, it will change our country because the scots and the northern ireland chose to stay but we don't know what brexit means stay but we don't know what brexit m ea ns yet stay but we don't know what brexit means yet and we won't know until spring next year. what is the timetable for the months ahead, the new year? in january the supreme court will rule and most people assume it will uphold the ruling. in february parliament will go forward with a bill, it could be four lines orfour pages, with a bill, it could be four lines or four pages, parliament will vote and once that goes through theresa may will trigger article 50. is it a foregone conclusion that it goes through because there have been agreements that parliament will vote for brexit? most parliamentarians get the facts because the people
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voted to leave the eu it would put them in an uncomfortable position to overrule, so i'm relatively certain parliament will pass whatever legislation goes forward.” interrupted you, sorry. she will trigger article 50 and then there will be a momentous moment of anti—climax because there's two yea rs of anti—climax because there's two years of negotiation, nothing will be clear this year, this will run and run because these negotiations are carried out at a technical level so we are carried out at a technical level so we won't see them, the french and germans have elections this year, they will be preoccupied saying they can't talk at the moment and are busy at home so this will run and run. in one answer, when the negotiations start, what's the format, is there a checklist? there is no answer. the other member states is said to theresa may, you need to give us a list of what you want. she has been very coy about it. she will be sketchier than they
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would like to be. i expect the first thing to happen will be an argument about the agenda for the talks. what do you make of that, but she is being more sketchy or calling? can she offer any answers? -- coy. it makes perfect sense. it is a big deal and will affect all aspects of this country and economy. the government is commissioning studies to see what will be best for britain. i would to see what will be best for britain. iwould not to see what will be best for britain. i would not expected to have a plan yet. when she gets in the room with the other eu leaders, they will expect clarity on where britain wants to end up and on the back of that start negotiating. the first negotiating is about living, not trade deals. it is about loose ends. what are the top three things we need to be concerned about, anyone watching at home? the thing eve ryo ne anyone watching at home? the thing everyone will care about most is what it means for the economy. we have already seen the pound falling. there is absolutely no way of
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knowing yet what brexit means for our economy and we know what brexit means. the first thing to do is see what happens to the economy going forward with foreign investment, ability to sign traders. the second thing is the future of the united kingdom. will scotland go back to its people and say let's have a vote on independence again. the third interesting thing is the speed at which politics is changing. at the moment you have a conservative party holding itself together because theresa may has not said anything specific. a labour party not proving especially effective in opposition. and you keep things it can profit. by—elections next you will be fascinating. it will be a busy year —— ukip. fascinating. it will be a busy year -- ukip. if fascinating. it will be a busy year —— ukip. if brexit means brexit, carol ‘s —— ukip. if brexit means brexit, carol '5 main carol. —— ukip. if brexit means brexit, carol 's main carol. carol squared. let's go to covent garden. it is boldly at covent garden. this
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isa it is boldly at covent garden. this is a brass band playing. i will let you listen to them —— cold. that was beautiful. we will be hearing a lot more from the brass band as we go to the course of the morning. it was founded in 1895, but none of these chaps look that old. it is festive in cove nt chaps look that old. it is festive in covent garden. we have the tree and mistletoe chandeliers, but the weather is not festive today. we have a met office amber weather warning for wind. this applies to the north and north—west of scotland, which is where we will have this strong wind, especially across the far north. we are looking at storm—force, with gusts up to 90 mph. it will be a windy day where ever you are. rain moving across scotland. some will be heavy with hill snow, and suite adds low levels. also getting into north—west england —— sleet at low levels. also
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towards hampshire, a dressed up. it should restart if you are venturing out. —— dry stuff. towards the south—west, it is dry. for wales, a dry start with the wind is picking up dry start with the wind is picking up close to the coast by nine o'clock. then affecting scotland will affect northern ireland this morning as it crosses. some heavy bursts in that would be strengthening winds. the strongest winds this morning will be across western scotland. through the day, it picks up as the weather front saint south. the rain on it not getting into the far south—east until around dusk. around that band of rain, it will be very squally. the wind will pick up. behind it, a return to showers. across northern england, northern ireland and scotland, away from the rest of
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england and wales, between 40 and 50 mph wind. the rain crews overnight, and behind it, a cold night with clear skies. strong winds across the north. severe gales in the final. a lot of showers with snow on the hills. we will start to see accumulations there. christmas eve started the squally winds in the north. bright sky and sunshine and a clear skies across england and wales. more rain later in the day bushin wales. more rain later in the day bush in across scotland, northern ireland, northern england and wales. —— pushes in. we start religiously noted in the south, but it will brighten up. a relatively bright start through the day, but a windy one in the northern half of the country. then we have a cold front sinking south. before that happens, we will have mild air, and we could see record—breaking temperatures across part of the uk. not everywhere. to do that, we have to be at 15.6dc, the previous record.
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somewhere like aberdeen could hit 16 celsius. when the weather front goes through bringing rain with it, cold airwill through bringing rain with it, cold air will push through bringing rain with it, cold airwill push in through bringing rain with it, cold air will push in with it, and by the end of the day, some parts of north scotla nd end of the day, some parts of north scotland could have a white christmas. that is fairly unusual. charlie! john. laughter merry christmas, carol. how can i say that? i have tissues for this tears. he still adores you. we will see you later. it is notjust any friday. it is frenzy friday. 10 million others apparently set to hit the supermarket aisles, or one another maybe. we will not be out there because we put out orders in with ben. let's see how he reacts.
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what was that, charlie? good morning. the sprouts are here. i'm assuming you don't want me to bring you to many of these. i have the shopping list for both of you. we are in coventry and catching up with last—minute shoppers. they are getting all of their last—minute bids they need. 10 million expected to come through the sikh market doors today. good morning. —— supermarket. this does not look like christmas food. this looks like party food. correct. we are out on christmas dinner with friends, so this is for boxing day. someone else is taking the burden of christmas day. yes, very nice. no sprouts in he. is that you're doing? yes. best of luck. happy christmas. i need a bit of help with my christmas
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shopping, so i have but —— gotten in a retail hub. we are stuck the shelves for those looking to do their bats christmas shopping. it is a whole operation running through the year to get it right for this last day. tomorrow begins the four—day weekend with sunday being christmas day. a lot of people will avoid shopping tomorrow. all the staff are working really hard to make sure we get our turkeys and sprouts on the table in time. thank you. i want to introduce you to claire, one of the bosses here at tesco. nice to see you. months of planning for you to get to this stage. tell me how it goes and how you put all of this together. absolutely right, months of planning. finally we see that come to execution on one of the busiest
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days of the year at tesco. all of our colleagues are embracing the festive spirit. they have their christmas jumpers on. it has been a really busy start. it is very encouraging. tell me he did get it right. you have to have enough stuff on the shelves to make so you don't end up with loads of stock you haven't sold. there is a real balance. the shelves are really for this morning and the most important thing is we have laid our store out as civil as we can. it is easy for our customers to get their gifts and last—minute trades. —— simply. we have employed over 15, 000 last—minute trades. —— simply. we have employed over 15,000 colleagues to help serve customers and look after them this christmas. thank you very much. there you have it. if you are heading up this morning, the busiest time of the day is expected to be 11 o'clock this morning. if you are heading out, make sure you have everything you need. i have my hat. i will see you later. send me the rest of your requests this morning. what else do you need?
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shoes. laughter always need shoes. we have been getting a behind—the—scenes glimpse. you have those lovely smooth shots, and you might think we have special equipment, this is how he got those living trolley shots. that is his camera crew this morning in the basket to get those lovely gliding images live from commentary. i don't know how they will get that to the checkout. that looks like fun. it has been awhile since i have been in a trolley. irregular item in checkout baggage area, they say. certainly is this morning. we will be with again shortly. this morning we've been talking about people who have inspired us in 2016. later we'll be meeting a few of them here on the breakfast sofa. let's take a look. music plays we knew we were going to get here.
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we are so proud of what we have done. would you say you have a positive attitude towards cancer? yes. i just have an attitude full stop. we've been thinking about who has inspired us this morning as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. chelsea have been cleared of breaking any premier league rules in the way the club handled claims of historical sexual abuse. garyjohnson — a youth team
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player in the 19705 — revealed he was paid 50,000 pounds to keep quiet about allegations against its former chief scout eddie heath. the club's apologised for what it calls his "unacceptable suffering" but the league said chelsea hadn't broken any rules by not reporting the allegations. rough sleepers in london have described being urinated on, having their belongings stolen and being sexually assaulted while living on the streets. research by the homeless charity crisis found more than 8 out of 10 rough sleepers have suffered some sort of attack or abuse this year. the consequences are immense, especially on the mental health of those individuals. we find in our centres people quite subdued, quiet, not wanting to talk about what has happened to them. that puts that person even further away from a solution. now, lots of you will be making your way out of london today
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for christmas so let's see what the travel situation is like at the moment. firstly the tubes — minor delays on the district line. looking quiet on the trains currently — no reported problems there — butjust a reminder that the last trains are earlier than usual on christmas eve and then lots of engineering works will begin across london — so the advice is to travel early. this is the a1. it is closed southbound for bridge works. the rate will then be closed in both directions for part of january. ! road. lots of disruption there. not much hope of a white christmas, but let's find out what the weather will be like. good morning. if you placed bets on a white christmas this year, you may be sorely disappointed as it's looking very mild over the next few days, and possibly even breaking records. for today, a bit of mist that will clear fairly early, and then it brightens up.
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a fair amount of cloud at times. not much in the way of sunshine. still fairly bright today. mild with temperatures around 11 or 12 celsius, and largely dry into the late afternoon. we will have strengthening winds as well. that rain coming through will become heavy through the night, so coupled with gusts of up to 40—50 mph, a fairly grotty night to come. temperatures down to four or five degrees. for christmas eve tomorrow, a largely dry and bright day. fairly breezy, but still quite pleasant if you do need to get any of those last—minute shopping trips in. temperatures up to nine or ten degrees celsius. 0vernight, the winds strengthen again. breezy on christmas day. still mild, and in the morning, a little bit of drizzle, but drying and brightening up for the afternoon. if you like to go for a post—christmas day lunch walk, you could be in luck for luck later on in the day. generally speaking, decent temperatures for this time of year. see you in half an hour.
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hello, this is breakfast. with naga munchetty. and jon kay. prison officers are back in control as a disturbance at swaleside, in kent, is brought to an end. 60 inmates were involved. it's the fourth major incident at an english prison in less than two months. good morning, it's friday the 23rd december. also this morning: a country on high alert. two men are arrested on terror charges in germany, as the hunt continues for the man responsible for the attack on a christmas market. delays and disruption are expected, as millions of people hit the roads, rails and skies before christmas. with around 12 million people
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expected to take to the roads today, we are not one of the busiest motorways in the country. traffic is starting to build up, we will have the full picture in 15 minutes. 10 million shoppers are expected in the supermarkets today for the last minute christmas shopping. they are calling it frenzied friday. all the details about what you need to know. and we have got beans on the menu, spilling the beans! and he's the strictly star that's been lucky enough to have both naga and carol as his partner. pasha kovalev will be here, and we'll be putting him through his paces. i want to know his secrets, who is his favourite, who is the naughtiest? could not possibly comment! looking forward to that! crystal palace are looking for a new manager after sacking alan pardew afterjust one win in eleven matches. he leaves the club sitting just above the relegation zone. and who has the christmas weather?
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ido! morning, carol! morning from a festive covent garden. the weather not so festive, we have storm barbara coming across our shores. everywhere is windy, the strongest north and west, with gusts of 90 mph across the far north of mainland scotla nd across the far north of mainland scotland and the northern isles. and a band of heavy rain sinking south east. more details in 15 minutes. see you then! good morning. first, our main story. the prison service says specialist guards have resolved a disturbance at swaleside jail, in kent, the fourth major incident at an english prison in less than two months. fires were lit when around 60 inmates took control of part of one wing yesterday evening, but they were returned to their cells overnight. 0ur reporter, peter whittlesea, is outside swaleside prison, on the isle of sheppey, for us this morning. good morning. what details do we know of what happened?
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there is a clearer picture of what happened yesterday. the prison 0fficers' association said there was tension about how long inmates would be locked up over christmas and there were raids on cells and things we re there were raids on cells and things were confiscated. after that, a riot started. the officers then retreated because they had lost control of the wing. 0nce because they had lost control of the wing. once they had retreated, prisoners started breaking things up, windows, and nowa prisoners started breaking things up, windows, and now a video has emerged of that. letting of fire extinguishers, brandishing billiard balls which they use as weapons. the prison service say their special tornado teams, riot trained officers, went into the prison to get control at 1am this morning. no members of staff or inmates were injured. peter, thank you. two men have been arrested in germany on suspicion of planning an attack on a shopping centre near the dutch border.
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the brothers were detained early this morning. germany is on high alert after monday's market attack in berlin, which left 12 people dead. authorities have issued an arrest warrant for tunisian man anis amri, whose fingerprints were found in the truck which ploughed into crowds. catriona renton has more. caught on a taxi's dashboard—mounted camera, the moment the lorry ploughed into the christmas market. the footage has been slowed down. 12 people were killed and dozens more injured. you can see people flee. this is anis amri, filming himself, humming a tune in berlin — a video posted to his facebook page in september. the 24 year old is now europe's most wanted man. first, his id documents were found in the cab, then his fingerprints were discovered on the driver's door and inside the lorry. raids at addresses of anis amri's known contacts in germany turned up nothing. his family in tunisia last
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saw him five years ago. they say he wasn't religious, drank alcohol, and dreamed of owning a car and starting a business. his mother spoke to reporters. translation: i have four sons, including him, and i think that we will not be counting him anymore. the news is very bad. we want to know the truth, if it was really him who did this, and then we will all punish him. germany's security services remain on high alert. last night, police arrested two brothers, originally from kosovo, suspected of planning an attack on a shopping mall in the western city of 0berhausen. it is not clear whether the alleged plot was in any way connected with monday's attack in berlin. now the breitscheidplatz market is back up and running. it is a show from berliners of defiance, strength and not giving in, as the investigation into what happened here continues. catriona renton, bbc news. syrian army has declared victory in
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aleppo. the east of the city had been held by rebels from more than four years, becoming a symbol of the opposition to president assad. state media said the last convoy taking rebel fighters and civilians had left. an army commander said they would now liberate the rest of the country. the christmas getaway cranks up a give. if you thought it would be easier to travel by train, there will be 200 sets of engineering works across the uk over the next few days. the main services affected are in and out of london, manchester and cardiff. record numbers of people also expected to pass through airports across britain as they leave the country for the christmas and new year period. maybe to try and new year period. maybe to try and get away from those traffic jams! we will be live at paddington and near the
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jams! we will be live at paddington and nearthe m6, jams! we will be live at paddington and near the m6, getting the latest travel indication on the rail and road networks. everything to get you through the next few hours and days. a survey of rough sleepers suggests they are 17 times more likely to be a victim of crime than the general public. the charity crisis says 80% of homeless people were attacked or suffered abuse over the past year. there are thought to be about 4,000 people sleeping rough in britain at any one time. the government is injecting £60 million a year to help first—time buyers get a foot on the housing ladder in areas where locals are crowded out of the market by second home owners. housing minister gavin barwell said the cash would be channelled through local councils to community—led groups providing affordable housing. a general supply in holiday homes but a shortage in affordable housing blight the lives of many in st ives. the government says that if a community has 21% of second home ownership, it becomes unsustainable
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and is on a slippery slope. in the ce ntre and is on a slippery slope. in the centre of st ives, we have 25% and increasing in some localised areas of second home ownership. so what is the solution? 0ne of second home ownership. so what is the solution? one idea is building so—called community led housing like these affordable flats in east london. they will be for local people on a local income and they can only be sold on the similar people at a similar rate. the government wants 10,000 of these over the next five years across england. to do that, the government has announced the day it will spend £60 million a year on affordable housing schemes funded by increases in stamp duty. a third of the part, £19 million, will go to the south—west, with the £11 million for the south—west and millions more shared out across england.” the south—west and millions more shared out across england. i think it isa shared out across england. i think it is a big problem in certain areas. one of the difficulties in my job is i have to set the national housing policy and things are different in different communities. i was different in different communities. iwas in different in different communities.
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i was in cornwall recently looking at the coastal towns and villages where it is a huge issue, people saying they need somebody to man the lifeboat and people cannot afford any of the homes in the village. today's announcement will create 10,000 homes, a small proportion of the government's target. labour says it isa the government's target. labour says it is a drop in the ocean for the most affected communities and offers nothing to those with no hope of ever getting on the housing ladder. for the first time ever, a snow leopard has been recorded with four cubs. yes, brilliant pictures. the footage has been captured on a camera trap in mongolia as part of monitoring work which began in 2011. not much snow for snow leopards! no, but they are thriving, the mother is going to have a busy time. it's the first time that quadruplet cubs have been registered. according to the world wildlife fund there are between 4,000 and 6,500 snow leopards living in the wild. the cats are threatened by poaching and loss of living space. but in mongolia, they seem safe
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enough. four new ones. good news. now, here is a question that meteorologists hate, is it going to snow on christmas day? it might do, we might get getting snow in some places, warm weather in other places. before you get to christmas, it you have got to get the christmas! easier said than done. if you're planning a christmas getaway, expect a delay or two. this weekend sees major engineering works begin on rail—lines in and out of london, manchester and cardiff. drivers are also likely to face tailbacks, as people head home for christmas. airports across britain are experiencing the busiest festive travel getaway ever, with more of us planning to leave the country than ever before over christmas and new year. 0ur transport correspondent, richard westcott, has the details you need. it's one of the busiest lines in britain. a vital link between london, south—west england and south wales. but they're shutting this section near london tomorrow as part of the biggest rail upgrade
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programme ever taken on. 24,000 staff will work on 200 projects across britain, but why pick christmas? we have a huge programme of works that we have to deliver as part of our railway upgrade programme, and some of that workjust can't be done on a live railway, we have to shut the railway. so christmas is the best time to do it because it's one of the quietest times of the year. it will hit services across the country. london's paddington station will close for six days after the last train leaves. services at other big stations, including london bridge, charing cross and liverpool street will be severely affected. there will be no trains late on christmas eve between cardiff central, bridgend, newport and the valleys, as they finish the biggest re—signalling job ever done. services around central manchester will also be affected. christmas engineering work overran two years ago, causing chaos because the backup plan failed. network rail says it's much better
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prepared now and all holiday work since then has gone without a hitch. a lack of trains will make it harder to get to some of the airports too. christmas eve is one of their busiest days of the year. and it will make the roads more congested. although 450 miles of road works are either being finished off or removed altogether over the holidays to try to ease any jams. richard westcott, bbc news. a lot of red lights, maybe not what you hope for! as we've just seen, there's lots of disruption expected on the roads and rail network. anisa kadri is at london paddington station and frankie mccamley is on the m6 at walsall to bring us the latest. anisa, what can we expect on the railways over the festive period? do the worst! well, 200 sets of rail engineering works across britain is
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what we can expect. and at paddington, you can see behind me more and more people arriving to make the big trip home for christmas. 0ne young woman said she will be celebrating on the devon coast, lucky her! if anybody turns up coast, lucky her! if anybody turns up at paddington tomorrow to get on a train, they will not be able to get on it because major upgrade work is starting at the station overnight and it will continue for several days. upgrade work is not only happening at paddington, also at other stations in london and big projects in places including manchester and cardiff. the advice is, check online and make sure you are across all developments. thank you for that advice. so maybe ta ke thank you for that advice. so maybe take the car instead, that will be easy! 0r take the car instead, that will be easy! or maybe not. frankie is on the m6, what is happening on the roads? well, the roads are getting quite busy this morning. we are on the m6, one of the most important and one of
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the busiest roads in the country connecting london with the midlands, manchester, and roads heading to scotland. you can see behind me traffic is already building up. around 12 million people expected on the roads. there are things being done to ease traffic, around 450 miles worth of roadworks being taken down over the festive period. but the strikes on the railway and the potential strikes on the planes could mean people are choosing to ta ke could mean people are choosing to take theircars could mean people are choosing to take their cars this christmas. so do expect delays if you are taking to the roads this morning. the advice is to take extra water, extra supplies, so you can get to where you are heading this christmas safely and on time. let's update you with the main stories this morning. the prison service says part of a prison wing on the isle of sheppey that was taken over on the isle of sheppey that was ta ken over by on the isle of sheppey that was taken over by about 60 inmates has been reclaimed. just days after an attack on a christmas market in berlin, police in germany have
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arrested two brothers on suspicion of planning another attack on one of the country's biggest shopping centres. carol is updating us with the weather. she is in covent garden and has company. it is lovely and festive here at covent garden this morning. that is the fulham brass band playing in the background, so i will be quiet and let you enjoy them for a bit. lovely. they are an amateur band, they have been in tv programmes, films, they have done concerts and they were formed by brick makers way backin they were formed by brick makers way back in 1895. i don't think those quys back in 1895. i don't think those guys were back in 1895. i don't think those guys were in the band in 1895. it is very festive in covent garden. the weather is not quite so festive. the met office has a amber weather warning out for wind. storm barbara
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will be crossing the shores today. she is already showing her hand. the strongest wind will be across the north and west. for more than scotland, the mainland and also the northern isles, we are looking at storm force winds later on. as well as the wind, we have a lot of rain moving across, the same band of rain affecting north west england. for north—eastern england, heading down the east coast, past the wash, east anglia, kent, the midlands, towards hampshire and the isle of wight, a dry start. just the odd shower and spot of drizzle. that extends into south—west england, where it is also dry. a variable amounts of cloud. for wales, a dry start, but that won't last. the wind is starting to strengthen around cardigan bay. for northern ireland, the same rain affecting scotland is putting across northern ireland. some will be heavy. the wind, continuing to strengthen. this morning, as barbara
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approaches, the strongest wind in the west. we are looking widely at gusts across northern england, northern ireland and scotland, between 60 and 80 mph. the exceptions are the far north of scotland, gusts of 90. the rain pushes south, and around that there will be squally wind. across england and wales we are looking at gusts of 40 or 50 mph. and wales we are looking at gusts of 40 or50 mph. behind and wales we are looking at gusts of 40 or 50 mph. behind that, we return to squally showers. some wintry, returning to the course of the night, across the northern half of the country, very windy. we lose the storm force and see severe gales. tomorrow morning, under clear skies, across england and wales, a cold start. also a sunny one, when the sun gets up. for northern ireland, northern england and scotland, we continue with showers. very strong wind and we have a culmination of rain, sleet, hail and possibly some thunder and hill snow. the snow is starting to accumulate. later in the
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day, more rain across scotland and northern ireland, northern england and north wales. for christmas day, it is going to be very mild across—the—board. in fact, we could have record—breaking temperatures, potentially, on christmas day. to do that, we have to exceed 50.6 celsius. that is possible. when we start the day in the south, it will be drizzly. —— 15.6. we have a weather front crossing. before that crosses , we weather front crossing. before that crosses, we could see temperatures in aberdeen 16 celsius. as the weather front moves through, cold air pushes behind. by the end of the day, some of us could be looking at a white christmas. more especially in scotland, rather than anywhere else. thank you very much indeed, carol. we are feeling very christmassy. we are very lucky to have spoken to famous people, politicians,
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personalities, but it is the stories of real people that have fought adversity, faced a really big challenges, it is those ordinary people that have done extraordinary things that have inspired us. with 2016 drawing to a close, we've been talking this morning about who and what has inspired you, and we've brought togetherjust a few of the many breakfast guests who've inspired us with what they did this year. joining us in the studio now is nicola murrells, colin hegarty, janette benaddi and helen butters. good morning to you all. nicola was asking him we were going to go to first. you weren't supposed to say that! we always make our guests feel co mforta ble. that! we always make our guests feel comfortable. i spoke to you not so long ago, at the christie centre in greater manchester earlier this year. tell us why? in 2013, i was
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diagnosed with bowel cancer and went through a lot of different battles. ifi through a lot of different battles. if i sound a bit weird, i am full of steroids and morphine. i might sound a little bit slurred. thank you so much for coming in, it must be physically draining.” much for coming in, it must be physically draining. i decided halfway through i was not going to have any more morphine, i wanted to ta ke have any more morphine, i wanted to take the immunothera py have any more morphine, i wanted to take the immunotherapy route. i also decided to start writing a blog to get my story across. this year, u nfortu nately get my story across. this year, unfortunately my diagnosis was reduced to 6—9 months, and then to nine weeks. that was about the beginning of september, as you can see, iam beginning of september, as you can see, i am not dead yet. one of the things that was so inspiring when we spoke to you, so many viewers responded to what has happened with you, you said, i have an attitude andi you, you said, i have an attitude and i am not going to be beaten.
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yes, my husband hates it, bless him, he suffers a lot, to be fair. it was devastating, i allow myself my pity party, i give myself 24 hours to feel sorry for myself, i can cry or get angry, whatever. at the end of the 24 hours, right, where are we going to go from now? that is what works for me at the moment. there will be plenty of people watching right now that have been inspired by every word you have said. thank you for coming in. colin, you have been inspiring ina for coming in. colin, you have been inspiring in a different way? you area inspiring in a different way? you are a teacher and you have had some year? yes, teaching is the most inspiring of alljobs. i am very proud to be a teacher. this year there was a global teacher prize and i was nominated in the top ten, the only uk teacher. i was very proud of that. i think it was more about celebrating great teachers, teachers and education is the key to a lot of
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the world's solutions. i think it is really important teachers have an elevated status and everybody celebrates the work they do. you are being inspiring, but what inspires you? the children inspire me. maths is my favourite subject. the reason i love it so much is because i think a lot of children don't like it, and i love that element of it. it is either right or wrong, if you are right with it a lot, you feel great, if you are wrong a lot, you feel bad about yourself. it is a great opportunity to turn a negative into a positive, learn from mistakes and learn that, with hard work and dedication, you can achieve great things. talking about numbers, we have spoken to four, we are subtracting two, two of the fall woman crew that made up the yorkshire rowers. we spoke to about the journey. 3000 yorkshire rowers. we spoke to about thejourney. 3000 nautical miles across the atlantic ocean. four of
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you decided to... on a whim, you decided to do this?” you decided to... on a whim, you decided to do this? i suppose you could say it was. francis asked if we wanted to row over the ocean. whenever anybody asked me anything, i always say yes, rightly or wrongly. we have learned to row together. that was, what, four years ago? itjust together. that was, what, four years ago? it just seemed together. that was, what, four years ago? itjust seemed like, why not? i think that was the answer, really. did you think you would have ca ptu red did you think you would have captured the imagination of people? we followed you, we were talking to you on the journey. we are really grateful for that. at first, you on the journey. we are really gratefulfor that. at first, it you on the journey. we are really grateful for that. at first, it was just a thing to do. we have been blown away by the amount of people that have come back to say, as a result, i am that have come back to say, as a result, iam now that have come back to say, as a result, i am now doing this. it ranges from cycling across vietnam to learning a new skill. four other women, a little bit older than us, going to do the same race next year. they have been inspired by us. there
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was a dark from yorkshire that wants to do it with three other dads. —— a dad. a guy we met called ian, he has done a film. we went to try to do some talking at different places, to inspire people, which we have been doing quite a lot of. he hasjust done a film about men that dance. he has always wanted to do that. it's really lovely. wherever we go, it seems like there is a trail of... 0h, seems like there is a trail of... oh, if you can do that, i can do this. it's fantastic. as you are fighting cancer and being so open about it, you must feel from other people that say you are inspiring me? in return, what does that give you? it was about writing the truth. i don't hold anything back, literally. i said before, i don't hold anything back, literally. isaid before, the i don't hold anything back, literally. i said before, the first timei literally. i said before, the first time i started writing my blog, i
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got the squits, and i allowed to say that? i put it online. 0ne got the squits, and i allowed to say that? i put it online. one of my friends said, did you realise you have told 20,000 people you cannot stay off the toilet? i am not medical, by any stretch of the imagination, but in terms of the questions i asked doctors, how i challenge it. likewise, theyjust wa nt to challenge it. likewise, theyjust want to tell me the story. it might not have a happy ending, it might be a tough battle, but the very fact that they have tried to get in touch, they have written down what they are going through, it is heartbreaking, and it is inspiring on its own. it makes a difference in terms of what i am putting down there. it is giving people a voice. iam going there. it is giving people a voice. i am going to the houses of parliament in february, to speak for cancer patients in terms of reducing the amount of time it takes to get
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trial drugs into the nhs. you can get them in europe, but not here, which is ridiculous. you are tireless, and you are an inspiration. all of you are. thank you for your views. james bates says her daughter—in—law has inspired her. she lost her dad to cancer, she is wonderful, her wedding day was faultless. more of those on the bbc breakfast facebook page. still to come this morning: if you're planning to pick up your turkey and sprouts today you won't be the only one. ben's out at a supermarket for us this morning, on what's predicted to be the busiest food shopping day of the year. is that a receipt in your hand? when isaid is that a receipt in your hand? when i said you could send me a list of things to pick up, this is not what i had things to pick up, this is not what ihad in things to pick up, this is not what i had in mind. 10 million of us are respected to pass to the checkouts.
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it has been called a frenzy friday. sprouts, turkey, fresh produce. i picked up something for you, john, a beard trimmer. i will bring it back for you. before that, the news where you are. storm barbara is approaching, battering north—western parts of the british isles over the next 12, 18 hours. the worst wing is impacting northern and north—western scotland. an amber warning from the met office. we could see guests of 82, 90 mph. later today. for most of us, it will not be as severe. this is the rain across many western part of the uk. gales around coasts, windy inland. the last place to get the bad weather will be east anglia and the
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south east. most of the day, might even be hazy sunshine. for many in the west, a blustery and ugly day. the night, the winds rage in the north, at storm force for a time, with hill snow in places. quieter across the south with clear spells. maybe tonight with frost in some areas, but not a lot. it is the hill snow in the north and the wintry element of the weather. storm barbara pushing into the norwegian sea during the christmas eve morning. still the gale blowing across northern areas. to the south, across northern areas. to the south, a lot better with sunshine around. christmas eve is looking fine across many eastern areas. it still will be windy. but there is more rain later for northern ireland and the north west of the uk. and we have round two of gales, this could be severe in the far north of the country. christmas itself is looking very
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mild. in fact, christmas itself is looking very mild. infact, it christmas itself is looking very mild. in fact, it could christmas itself is looking very mild. infact, it could be christmas itself is looking very mild. in fact, it could be one of the mildest christmas days in nearly 100 years, with gale force winds may be up to 15 degrees in the south. this is business live from bbc news, with aaron heslehurst and maryam moshiri. as 2016 draws to a close, we'll look back on a year which featured two events that will shape the global economy for decades to come. welcome to business live: review 2016. this year saw the uk take the momentous decision to leave the european union. we'll take a look at what lies in store in the next 12 months. defying all the odds! he did it! billionaire businessman donald trump wins the race for the white house. he's made some bold announcements, but was it all talk and no action?
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and it's been a turbulent yearfor global markets.

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